All posts by Amy Rich

The Grand Canyon Project Banner

Other interesting projects that I’ve done in my career:

Patchwork Central's Permanent Art Collections

Grand Canyon Project Banner

Title: Grand Canyon Project Banner

Artist: Arts & Smarts Program Participants

Date: 2000

This is the giant banner that was made in Patchwork Central’s after school art program in 2000. The children created large self portraits which were cut out and pasted onto a cloth that they had painted to represent the Grand Canyon.  At the bottom of the banner is a “strata study” detailing significant events in the children’s lives for each year of their life, much in the way the layers of rock at the Grand Canyon (and elsewhere) have recorded their own chronological record.

The Banner was created to accompany Amy Rich and Jane Vickers on their epic travels to the Grand Canyon during the summer of 2000. Amy and Jane documented their travels on a website (back when websites were new and blogging was unknown). The trip took three weeks and during that time Amy & Jane collected found objects to…

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The Piece that Isn’t

Way Up in the Middle of the Air Way Up in the Middle of the Air (detail)

This piece of art doesn’t exist, even though it’s the most recent piece I’ve been working on.  With it, I learned that when you’re making art out of found objects, you’d best do your research.

The centerpiece is a beautiful little nest that I found on the ground last fall.  I created a mass of glitter and googly eyes to surround it. Someone remarked that the glittery circle was reminiscent of Ezekiel’s vision of a wheel covered in eyes, which I liked. The inspiration for the piece hadn’t been the Bible verse, but I decided to make a reference to the folk song “Ezekiel Saw the Wheel” by titling the piece “Way Up in the Middle of the Air”.

I was about to deliver the piece to a local exhibit when it occurred to me that perhaps birds’ nests are included in the same regulations that forbid anyone from possessing feathers or other parts of wild birds. I looked it up, and they do.

I should have done more research first. I disassembled the piece for now, but you may see it reinvented later–minus the nest.

Honeybee

Honeybee

My “Honeybee” photograph is part of the Ohio Valley Art League’s Nature Photography exhibit that’s on display in the Rotunda Gallery of the Henderson County Public Library in Henderson, Kentucky from now through January 3, 2014.

I went to the opening last night and received the Third Place Award!

I’ve got so many photographs I’ve taken at Patchwork and for my garden blog. I’m glad I decided it’s time to do something more with them.

This photo was taken in the garden at Patchwork. I took a bunch of photos of sunflowers this summer and was intrigued by the way that the florets at the center of the sunflowers open a ring at a time. Then the bee came along at just the right moment.

The Cicadas’ Dance is Music to My Eyes

Cicadas' Dance

A couple weeks ago, the sound of the cicadas was deafening. For a piece earlier this summer, I’d felt lucky to have found a single cicada shell, but I decided to look again after having my ears assaulted. This time, I came up with quite a collection.

I’d wanted to make a piece for a local recycled art show, so I used the cicadas as an inspiration, building a kind of mandala from them and some crazy lenticular eyes I’d picked up at the Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore. Throw in some old buttons, wedding confetti I picked off the ground in Germany, old doilies, beads, pins, sequins, and thread, and it’s a writhing dance of empty shells and eyeballs.

A Third Relic

Relic #3

This is the third of three Relics that I made recently. This one is made from two beaded tomatillo husks, thread, a thread spool, an old button, and a weird metal hand from somewhere or other.

I collected the tomatillo husks from the ground in my garden. It was interesting to me how much they softened and didn’t break the more I worked with them as I added beads. By the end, they had started to resemble loosely woven fabric, not brittle leaf veins.