Dialogue

Dialogue

Title: Dialogue
Materials: A stuffed cat, my real cat, bra under wire, pop can, toy and game pieces, old jewelry, fur coat, pop can, glitter, paint, thread
Dimensions: 10″ x 7″ x 5″
On exhibit now through May 6 at the Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana as part of the “Another’s Treasure” art from recycled materials exhibit. Opening reception on April 22 from 5:30-7.

Little Unnamed Birds

I’ve been working on this series of little birds made out of parts of toys, broken jewelry, an old fur coat, and a few other scraps of things.

I’m working on a display for them next, and a name will come later as well, but they are fun little guys, so I tool photos of them individually before combining them into something bigger. They’re a work in progress.

Click on any of the images below to get a closer look.

Here’s the line up:

All 5 little birds

 

Bird A:

Bird B:

Bird C:

Bird D:

Bird E:

Shots in the snow at a less-complete stage:

And at the beginning stages when you could see what they’re made of:

P1350234b

They move in a sweet and wonderful way that, unfortunately, can’t really be part of the final display. While I was photographing them, I noticed the way the wind would catch them and make them bob. Here’s a sample with chirping birds in the background:

Patchwork Central Residency

Patchwork Central artwork

the making of a character

In June when we needed a last minute guest artist to lead sculpture week at Patchwork Central (where I normally work as Co-Director), I was happy to jump in. I enjoyed interacting with the Arts & Smarts participants in a way that was different than I usually do. They were wonderful students.

We created fabric people. For our materials we pulled clothing out of Patchwork’s small clothing bank and used them in addition to the regular art supplies that have been donated to the Arts & Smarts program. I’ve done this project with many groups now, but each time I lead it, things go in new and interesting directions. This time around, each sculpture became a fleshed out character and its creator wrote its backstory.

On the last day of the class, we went around the room and everyone shared the story behind their character. It became a wonderful storytelling circle in which everyone was encouraged and celebrated. It was wonderful.

Below is a slideshow of the art that was created. If you click on an image, you’ll be able to read the story that accompanied it.

Granville Senior Center

I recently completed a two-week art residency that was sponsored by the Ohio Arts Council’s Artful Aging Ohio program that is “committed to enhancing the quality of life for seniors through meaningful experiences in the arts”.

I was based at the Granville Senior Center in Granville, Ohio, but also taught in two assisted living centers. Below is a gallery of photos from the residency and some quotes from my students. I enjoyed getting to know them all and I enjoyed providing them with an art experience that they found meaningful and different than the activities they normally encounter.

“You don’t know what it will be or what it will look like—just start making something!” –Don

“You don’t even know how much I’ve enjoyed this. And I’m shocked to have enjoyed it so much.” –Beulah

“This was different than anything they would have done with us here.” –Millie

“I enjoyed you doing this. It was great to have you here to do this.” –Lois

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Earthen Vessels

Guilt and Love

Loss and Healing

I just finished a week sharing my art and my process with the children at Patchwork Central, where most of the time the children see me as the Co-Director and camera lady.

It was fun to share my sculpture with them, and it was very fun to see the art that they created. It was also great to work again with my friend and fellow artist Jane Case Vickers. I started my career in community art almost 18 years ago by teaching art as Jane’s assistant in Patchwork’s Arts & Smarts Children’s Program.

I was very glad to get to teach with Jane again–I think she’s a great artist and a great teacher. We’ve always been attracted to similar materials and have similar artistic inspirations. We’ve done several projects and exhibits together.

One of these collaborative projects was called “Earthen Vessels”. We each created a series of female figures that explored the human form as a container for emotions and experiences. Each figure expressed an individual emotion or memory using  found fabrics and found objects that we felt were symbolic of the theme.

The images above show my work paired with Jane’s. The first shows Jane’s depiction of Guilt (titled “Guilt: She’s Got a Belly Full of Walnuts”) and my depiction of Love. The second shows my depiction of Loss and Jane’s depiction of Healing. They range from 64″ tall to 40″ tall.

When we took these photos, we intentionally paired a more positive emotion with a more negative one to highlight the interaction between the two.